Nber dating

Attempts have been made to date recessions in America beginning in 1790.Robert Hall, Chair -- Past Director of NBER's Program on Economic Fluctuations and Growth and Professor, Stanford University Martin Feldstein -- President Emeritus of NBER and Professor, Harvard Univerity Jeffrey Frankel -- Director of NBER's Program on International Finance and Macroeconomics and Professor, Harvard University Robert J. Valerie Ramey -- NBER Research Associate and Professor, University of California, San Diego Christina Romer -- Co-Director of NBER's Program on Monetary Economics and Professor, University of California, Berkeley David Romer -- Co-Director of NBER's Program on Monetary Economics and Professor, University of California, Berkeley James Stock -- NBER Research Associate and Professor, Harvard University Mark W.Our time series is composed of dummy variables that represent periods of expansion and recession.

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Selected papers were published in the The 24th annual International Seminar on Macroeconomics, organized by Jeffrey Frankel and Francesco Giavazzi, was held in Dublin, Ireland, June 8-9, 2001, hosted by Vincent Hogan, University College, Dublin.

This time series is an interpretation of US Business Cycle Expansions and Contractions data provided by The National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) at

Selected papers were published in the The 25th annual ISo M met in Frankfurt, Germany, June 14-15, 2002, hosted by Otmar Issing and Frank Smets, the European Central Bank.

The program was organized by Jim Stock and Lars Svensson.

For more options on recession shading, see the notes and links below.

The recession shading data that we provide initially comes from the source as a list of dates that are either an economic peak or trough.

The National Bureau's Business Cycle Dating Committee maintains a chronology of the U. The period from a peak to a trough is a recession and the period from a trough to a peak is an expansion.

According to the chronology, the most recent peak occurred in March 2001, ending a record-long expansion that began in 1991.

The NBER defines a recession as "a significant decline in economic activity spread across the economy, lasting more than two quarters which is 6 months, normally visible in real gross domestic product (GDP), real income, employment, industrial production, and wholesale-retail sales". recessions have increasingly affected economies on a worldwide scale, especially as countries' economies become more intertwined.

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